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jenn

Murder by Death

I read cozy and historical mysteries, a bit of Paranormal/UF, and to mix it up, I read science and gardening books on occasion.

Kate Daniels series re-read: Magic Bleeds

Magic Bleeds - Ilona AndrewsMagic Bleeds- also known as the Book Where Curran Stops Being an Ass.

 

In my original post about the book, I said I thought it was the best one yet. and on re-reading, I stand by this sentiment.  For me, this is where the series stared going from mildly amusing library reads, to now-I-have-to-own-them-all.  I don't remember enjoying Erra's humor as much the first time around, and a series where the two protagonists work together is infinitely preferable (to me) than one where they battle each other more than they battle their foes.  So all in all, this is the book where the series got good and I got invested.

 

I decided to read this book for my Read by Candlelight or Flashlight square.  I'm assuming my itty bitty book light counts as a flashlight.  I also had some assistance from an able bodied feline:

 

 

 

 


Halloween Bingo 2019 - Tracking Update #4

Progress!  It's happening slowly but surely.  Well, the calls that match my card are slow but sure; my reading has actually been humming along at a good clip. 

 

Since my last update, I finished my Country House Mystery square: Envious Casca, and moved on to finish Creepy Crawlies, Black Cat, Doomesday, Fear the Drowning Deep, and 13.  I have two very boring days at work to thank for two of those squares.

 

This leaves me with 3 possible bingos just waitin' on the calls, and a few called squares I need to get cracking on, so I'm either going to be good and start reading my Darkest London book next, or cave and start reading a book that just came in that will work for New Release.  We'll see.

 

 

For my BookLikes tracking post, I'm going to rely on what I did last year, building an overall image as boxes are called.

 

 

Squares are greyed out until they're called.  

Called squares will be full-strength.

 

Read but not called squares will be greyed out below.

Once a square has been called and read, I'll move that piece from below to cover the square. 

 

My markers this year are pieces of a full image, seen here:

       
 
   
   
 

 

 

My tentative plan for what I'm reading.  I think there's going to be a lot of re-reads in the mix, given my current mood.  After I've read for a square, I'll hyperlink to the review.

 

 

Bingo Square

Date Called

Book Title

Date Read

Row #1

 

 

 

X 

Supernatural

 Sep. 15

Sweep of the Blade

Sep. 3 

X 

Read by flash/candlelight

Sep. 20 

Magic Bleeds

Sep. 23 

 

Dark Academia

 

 

 

X 

Black Cat

Sep. 8 

Murder in the Reading Room

Sep. 19 

X 

Country House Mystery

Sep. 13 

Envious Casca

Sep. 17 

Row #2

 

 

 

X 

Ghost Stories

 Sep. 1

Lost Among the Living

 Sep. 1

 

Paint it Black

 

Dark Triumph

 Sep. 1

 

In the dark, dark woods

 

Mortal Heart

Sep. 3 

 

13

 

Summoned to Thirteenth Grave

 Sep. 21

 

Murder Most Foul

 

St. Peter's Fair

Sep. 9 

Row #3

 

 

 

 

Shifters

 

Clean Sweep

Sep. 7 

 

Doomsday

 

Magic Strikes

Sep 20 

 

FREE SPACE

 

Murder by the Book: The Crime That Shocked Dickens’s London

Sep. 11 

 

Fear the Drowning Deep

 

Magic Burns

Sep. 19 

X 

Amateur Sleuth

 Sep. 4

The Book Supremacy

Sep. 14 

Row #4

 

 

 

X 

Spellbound

Sep. 22 

Sapphire Flames

 Sep. 5

X 

Creepy Crawlies

 Sep. 3

Kill The Farm Boy (Tales of Pell, #1)

Sep. 19 

 

New Release

 

 

 

 

Gothic

 

 

 

 

Genre:Suspense

 

 

 

Row #5

 

 

 

 

Magical Realism

 

Midnight at the Blackbird Cafe

Sep. 9 

X 

Psych

Sep 16 

Silence for the Dead

 Sep. 11

 

Full Moon

 

Such is Death

 

 

Darkest London

Sep. 17 

An Act of Villainy

 

 

Baker Street Irregulars

 

 

 



Summoned to Thirteenth Grave (Charley Davidson, #13)

Summoned To Thirteenth Grave - Darynda Jones

The last book in the series; the one meant to wrap up all the loose ends, and it does so admirably.

 

When I read the first book, I liked it for the mysteries and the humor, though the humor was a little over-played (her penchant for naming everything grated on my nerves, and though she never stops doing it, it plays a much smaller part in the narratives of future books).  As the series progressed, I still read them for the mysteries and I enjoyed the humor more because it became more balanced, but I also got stuck into the mythology Jones was using for the overall series arc.  And I genuinely became attached to the wacky cast of characters that surrounded Charley.

 

This final book winds up the arc concerning the prophecies involving Charley and Reyes - and keeps the possibilities open for a future series featuring their daughter and her prophesied battle against Lucifer.  Since the 13th book was meant to be the finale, there are no loose ends or questions - though there were a couple of didn't-see-that-coming twists, one full-blown M. Night Shyamalan shocker, and a single misty-eyed moment I'm wiling to admit to.

 

The only bit that left me disappointed was the end-end; the part where we find out what Charley and Reyes do.  It's not anything short of a happy ending, but I didn't like it.  I get it, and I get why it was the perfect ending, but I still didn't like it, and mostly for juvenile reasons.

 

They left their friends and family behind to become incorporeal so they could protect their daughter.  Altruistic and purely unselfish, but I still didn't like imagining a book world where the gang isn't all together.  Sue me.

(show spoiler)

 

While I'm sad to see the story end, and sad I won't see the gang anymore, I'm happy with the series ending now rather than past its prime, and Darynda Jones has a new series coming out next year that sounds like it might be fun, so perhaps I'll have a new series to love and look forward to.

 

I read this book for Halloween Bingo's 13 square.  13 in the title, and 13th in the series.



Re-reading Kate Daniels series ... Magic Strikes

Magic Strikes -  Ilona Andrews

Re-reading this, I remembered it's probably my least favorite in the series, but only because pit fighting/gladiator games don't interest me at all.  Otherwise, it's an excellent read.  Although, I found the same jarring continuity error in the ebook I checked out from the library this time as I found the first time I read it, and it still jarred me out of the story completely.  I thought the bonus of ebooks was the ability to update them quickly when errors were found?

 

Anyway, doesn't matter.  It was a good read, with a few scenes I had to read out loud to MT, including Raphael's re-telling of how his father woo'd his mother.  I almost couldn't read it to him for laughing ... that cat got his righteous revenge.

 

I'm going to use this re-read for the Doomsday square on my Halloween Bingo card.  It takes place in an alternate Atlanta that could definitely qualify for post-apocalyptic.  



Re-reading Kate Daniels series ... Magic Burns

Magic Burns -  Ilona Andrews

I didn't quite get enough Ilona Andrews last month, and being bored at work the other day, desperate for something to kill time, I remembered I have American library cards, so I went to my Libby app and borrowed the second book in the Kate Daniels series.

 

What I wrote in my original post is still relevant; I still think the comment Curran made about saying please and thank you before he sleeps with Kate is, to say the least, off-putting.  But I'd forgotten a lot of the plot after all this time, and had conflated parts of it with other plot-lines in the series.  Finishing it, I immediately downloaded book 3 and dived right in (I have most of the books in print, save for 2-4, which I never did buy - must remedy that).  

 

Delightfully, one of the things I'd forgotten was that the bad guys were sea-demons - Fomarians.  So that qualifies this book for the Fear The Drowning Deep square in Halloween Bingo.



Kill The Farm Boy (Tales of Pell, #1)

Kill the Farm Boy - Luke Daniels, Delilah Dawson, Kevin Hearne

I don't even know how to start talking about this book.  It's insane.

 

I first heard about it from Irresponsible Reader and I've been enjoying Kevin Hearne's Iron Druid Chronicles for a few years.  And it's subtitle sold me:

 

Once A Pun A Time...

 

So I was expecting a funny read and I was expecting the puns, but I wasn't at all expecting the sheer enormity of innuendo and entendres: double, triple - possibly quadruple, but I suspect some of it went over my head as I struggled now to drown in the Monty Python-esque silliness of it all.  Examples include a chapter involving the band of unlikely heroes traveling through the elven Morning Wood, with more innuendo, puns and entendres than you can possibly imagine, and later in the book a trip to a pub called Balzac's, where the chef is the famous "wrinkled Balzac", and the house speciality is candied nuts.

 

It's quite frequently over-the-top, but it's still hilarious and sometimes sweet and a little bit shocking in unexpected ways.  My favorite character was Gustave, the talking goat, by a large margin, though the rest of the band of unlikely adventurers all have their own charms too.  

 

It's incredibly well-written and it's obvious the authors had a good time writing it, but Luke Daniels did an exceptional job narrating this book.  This is one of those rare instances where I think the reader would lose something by reading a physical copy.  Daniels owns this book and the characters in it, reading it like a dramatisation.  I recommend the audio unreservedly for anyone looking for a goofy good time.

 

I started the book in August, but it was due back at the library before I was half finished, and I didn't get it back until after Halloween Bingo started, so it qualifies. As there were scenes involving necro-bees and acid leeches, I'm going to use this for the Creepy Crawly square.



Murder in the Reading Room (Book Retreat Mystery, #4)

Murder in the Reading Room  - Ellery Adams

I can't believe I finished this.  It got a star for the plot's premise, half a star for being relatively well edited and a half star as a bonus because I didn't DNF it.

 

Where to start...

 

I liked the series premise, about a secret library that holds the rarest, secret or unknown manuscripts from around the world, but as the series progresses, the author falls into the common trap of writing herself into corners from which she can't escape without abusing a reader's ability to suspend disbelief.  This book has the manager of the Storyton Inn haring off to the Biltmore Estate to rescue her lover from a dungeon.  Where he's being held by a renegade faction of the Templars.  Along side her:

 

long-thought dead (9 years) husband,

(show spoiler)

 

who's being held in the dungeon next door.  Give. me. a. break.  I hate this trope so much, I almost DNF'd it on the spot. 

 

Then I had to endure constant philosophical musings about love, the power of love, the power of family, more crap about love.  And the villain was supposed to be super evil, but I just didn't feel it.  I mean, he was definitely without redeeming qualities, but evil?  Eh.

 

The ending ... was eye-rolling.  I'm sorry, but it involved blow darts, and the most insanely insincere scene where the MC confronts her ignorance about cultural insensitivity that I've ever read.  Honestly, it's so badly done I'm tempted to quote it, but to do that I'd have to read it again.

 

The author would have gotten a tiny bonus for not taking that spoiler above to the most nauseating conclusion possible, or stringing it painfully over several books, but by the time it was resolved I'd lost the will to give any bonus points.

 

What kept me reading this farce was the idea of Hemingway's lost suitcase being hidden in the Inn and the search through letters and correspondence for clues to find it.  And that 10% of the book was kind of good, though the eventual conclusion was a bit deflating as it was so predictable.

 

I think it's safe to say I'm done with this series, but I read it for the Black Cat square in Halloween Bingo, so it wasn't a complete waste of time.



Envious Casca

Envious Casca - Georgette Heyer

That half star is because my expectations, based on previous Heyer mysteries, were completely blown away.

 

Envious Casca is both a text-book Country House Mystery and Locked Room Mystery, and it's far and away the best Heyer mystery I've read so far.  It's a slow burn, certainly; almost half the book goes by before anyone dies, but Heyer placates her audience - at least this one - with the acerbic humour and no-holds-barred verbal warfare that takes place amongst the family members, written brilliantly by Heyer.  These people are so vile to each other the only wonder is that the blades didn't come out sooner; at one point, tea was served and I thought to myself "I wouldn't drink that if I were you. Any of you."

 

It feels like it would be too easy to give away important plot points here, so I'll just say the murderer wasn't who I thought it would be (although I was close), some of the characters were a little too vile to be believed, and I'd have preferred at least one more paragraph, preferably a page, at the end.  There's a small romance, because it's Heyer, but I'm not sure it isn't launched and HEA'd all on the same page, so it's really not more than a small also-ran.  That it would end the way it did felt inevitable, but there was never any actual romancing.

 

The more I type, the closer I get to spoilers, so just read it if you like anything you've ever read by Heyer (she's hit and miss in both romance and mystery) and you're in the mood for a slow read with great, biting dialogue.  I don't think you'll be disappointed.

 

I read this for Halloween Bingo's Country House Mystery square.



Book Hauls in aggregate

Yesterday MT uttered 6 of my favorite words to me:  I'm out of books to read.  This means it's time for our bi-annual pilgrimage to our local bookstore, where he creates an obscene pile in 0.4 seconds while I'm still struggling to find the new releases table.

 

I've also received quite a few new books this month, including an unexpected score from Otto Penzler's recent auction of his collection, a vintage copy of The Red House Mystery, and a collection of short stories from Milne, A Table Near the Band.  They were auctioned as a lot, and I put in a low ball bid expecting to be outbid in minutes, when instead I won.  Woot.

 

 

A few Halloween possibilities because they're mysteries (and one magical realism), but nothing really in-season.



Halloween Bingo 2019 - Tracking Update #3

Finally, a square has been called that's on my card.  I went through quite a dry spell there with only 1 of mine called in the last 8; to be expected with the new rules, but nevertheless is was nice to see one of mine show up today.

 

I've just finished my book for the Amateur Sleuth square - though it's the 13th book in the series, so I reserve the right to change it up if my planned book for the 13 square doesn't arrive in time.  I also have the Free Space read done and dusted.  I'll be starting on my Country House Mystery next: Envious Casca.

 

For my BookLikes tracking post, I'm going to rely on what I did last year, building an overall image as boxes are called.

 

 

Squares are greyed out until they're called.  

Called squares will be full-strength.

 

Read but not called squares will be greyed out below.

Once a square has been called and read, I'll move that piece from below to cover the square. 

 

My markers this year are pieces of a full image, seen here:

     
 
   
 
 

 

 

My tentative plan for what I'm reading.  I think there's going to be a lot of re-reads in the mix, given my current mood.  After I've read for a square, I'll hyperlink to the review.

 

 

Bingo Square

Date Called

Book Title

Date Read

Row #1

 

 

 

X 

Supernatural

 Sep. 15

Sweep of the Blade

Sep. 3 

 

Read by flash/candlelight

Sep. 20 

 

 

 

Dark Academia

 

 

 

X 

Black Cat

Sep. 8 

Murder in the Reading Room

Sep. 19 

X 

Country House Mystery

Sep. 13 

Envious Casca

Sep. 17 

Row #2

 

 

 

X 

Ghost Stories

 Sep. 1

Lost Among the Living

 Sep. 1

 

Paint it Black

 

Dark Triumph

 Sep. 1

 

In the dark, dark woods

 

Mortal Heart

Sep. 3 

 

13

 

Summoned to Thirteenth Grave

 Sep. 20

 

Murder Most Foul

 

St. Peter's Fair

Sep. 9 

Row #3

 

 

 

 

Shifters

 

Clean Sweep

Sep. 7 

 

Doomsday

 

Magic Strikes

Sep 20 

 

FREE SPACE

 

Murder by the Book: The Crime That Shocked Dickens’s London

Sep. 11 

 

Fear the Drowning Deep

 

Magic Burns

Sep. 19 

X 

Amateur Sleuth

 Sep. 4

The Book Supremacy

Sep. 14 

Row #4

 

 

 

 

Spellbound

 

Sapphire Flames

 Sep. 5

X 

Creepy Crawlies

 Sep. 3

Kill The Farm Boy (Tales of Pell, #1)

Sep. 19 

 

New Release

 

 

 

 

Gothic

 

 

 

 

Genre:Suspense

 

 

 

Row #5

 

 

 

 

Magical Realism

 

Midnight at the Blackbird Cafe

Sep. 9 

X 

Psych

Sep 16 

Silence for the Dead

 Sep. 11

 

Full Moon

 

Such is Death

 

 

Darkest London

Sep. 17 

An Act of Villainy

 

 

Baker Street Irregulars

 

 

 



The Book Supremacy (Bibliophile Mystery, #13)

The Book Supremacy - Kate Carlisle

This used to be one of my favorite mystery series, and it has all the things I generally enjoy: likeable, fleshed out secondary characters, strong friendships, wacky families, and the bookbinding angle is a serious plus.  But the last couple of books have felt heavier handed than usual in terms of the relationship between the MC Brooklyn, and her now-husband, Derek.  Lovey Dovey is the only term I can think of to adequately describe it.  I prefer affection to be subtle and I don't need to be reminded how much they're in love.  It was all a bit too sweet.

 

The plot of this one, too, felt overdone.  The guilty person was a caricature villain, and I think it coloured the overall premise of the murder plot: the killer felt cartoonish and silly, so  the plot did too, just a little bit.  It's not a fair bleed over; objectively, the plot it good and not at all a stretch given character back stories.  But the murderer's characterisation just sort of ruined it.

 

In spite of all of this, I still enjoyed the story well enough; I love the characters and having just recently been to San Francisco, the setting was fun to re-visit. 

 

I read this book for Halloween Bingo's Amateur Sleuth square.



Slot car kitty leans into the curve ...

Apropos of nothing, I tried a tamarind curry tonight.   Not. a. fan.

 



A re-read for the Psych square

Silence for the Dead - Simone St. James

Normally the Psyche square would be an automatic transfiguration spell usage, because I categorically do not like psychological thrillers/horror, but I had this Simone St. James book on my shelves because I love her ghost stories, and it so happens it takes place in a remote, isolated mental hospital for WWI veterans suffering shell-shock.  I read it back in 2016 and it was overdue for a re-read.

 

I stand by my original review (4 stars) - this one is almost less a ghost story than a horror story.  High creep factor, and an ending that isn't entirely wrapped up in a bow.

 



Murder by the Book: The Crime That Shocked Dickens’s London

Murder by the Book - Claire Harman

I picked this up while cruising through my new subscriptions with the Free Library of Philadelphia, and Orange County Library Systems, wallowing in their audiobook choices, and trying to find something to listen to while waiting for Kill The Farm Boy to come my way. 

 

I knew nothing about the book, save what I read in the summary.  In a nutshell, it's something like a forensic examination of the Courvoisier trial in 1840, for the murder of Lord William Russel.  Courvoisier was Russel's valet, and was accused of cutting his Lord's throat while he slept, a crime that was disturbingly close to the one committed in the newest prose sensation tearing through London, William Harrison Ainsworth’s Jack Sheppard.  A book the accused cited as a contributing factor when he confessed.

 

First of all, the narrator, Andy Secombe, was excellent; his accent was so very British, and though I have a Yank's tin ear for regional dialects, his variations of the many, many voices quoted in the book, accurate or not, made it easy to follow along and not get too bogged down or confused.  There were a few times I wondered if he was having just a bit of fun with some of the 'characters'; it was subtle and arguable, and it might just be I've watched too many old BBC comedies, but it did not in any way hurt the tone of the narrative.

 

To call the book fascinating would be stretching the point, I think, but it was an interesting read, and a very topical reminder that the more things change, the more they stay the same.  Our culture's current debate over 'do violent video games/music lyrics/movies corrupt our youth?' is merely the modern spin of the 1870's version of the same debate: 'do violent, sensationalist crime novels/theatre corrupt society?'  I also couldn't help but think of the parallels between the phenomenon that was Jack Sheppard and the mad rush to get it on stage, and the 50 Shades insanity just a few years back.  Neither book was lauded for its literary merit, merely it's scandalous and shocking content; both translated equally disastrously, though with the same raging popularity, to the stage/screen.

 

The author ends the book by pointing out the myriad of questions surrounding Courvoisier's guilt, in spite of the multitude of official confessions the man made.  Those multiple confessions are part of the reason questions remain - no two confessions tell the same tale - and the forensic information gleaned from the reports and accounts do not fit with any of Courvoisier's versions of the events.  In an age when the UK had public hangings and no appeal process, I'm going to go out on a limb here and say no man would have confessed had he not been guilty; there were easier ways to commit suicide.  Sometimes even shoddy investigations end up finding the culprit.

 

The single disappointment I had with the book also came at the end, when Harman is outlining possible motives; she hints at the possibility of a homosexual relationship between the Lord and his valet.  I found this in and of itself to be sensationalist for a couple of reasons: Harman readily admits that Lord William Russel was by all accounts a happily married man before his wife died and that he continued to remember her fondly; Courvoisier was known in the past to have had one or two female relationships, though he was unattached at the time of the murder; and Courvoisier had only been under Lord William Russel's employ a very short period before the murder - 6 weeks if I'm remembering correctly.  Given the prejudice and the laws of the time, a secret relationship was not impossible, but it was certainly improbable given the known facts.  Maybe the author felt like any objective consideration of the case would be incomplete without raising the possibility, but to me it just came across as hearing hoofbeats and screaming Zebras.

 

To be fair, Harman probably devoted fewer words to the possibility than I just did, or at least not many more, so it's a tiny blip in an otherwise interesting peek into the past.

 

I started reading this before I really knew what squares I had on my card, and I don't have the Truly Terrifying square for which this would be a perfect fit, but I'll use it for my Free Space square.



Halloween Bingo 2019 - Tracking Update #2

Not many squares on my card have been called as of yet, but I've been reading like a fiend and ticking off squares as I go.  I have had to plan or purpose and in fact have been doing a lot of spontaneous re-reading of old favourites, so strategically ... well, let's just say I have no strategy.

 

I still don't have anything to read for Creepy Crawlies so I'll likely use a transfiguration spell for that square; I just have to make sure I don't have more squares than spell cards.  I have a couple of possibles for the Black Cat square, but find myself lukewarm about them both.

 

In the meantime, I've finished my Murder Most Foul and Magical Realism reads, and since I re-read Clean Sweep over the weekend, I'll put that to work on my Shifters square.  I feel like when I get home tonight, I'll probably start on my Psych square book (also a re-read).

 

For my BookLikes tracking post, I'm going to rely on what I did last year, building an overall image as boxes are called.

 

 

Squares are greyed out until they're called.  

Called squares will be full-strength.

 

Read but not called squares will be greyed out below.

Once a square has been called and read, I'll move that piece from below to cover the square. 

 

My markers this year are pieces of a full image, seen here:

 
 

 

 

My tentative plan for what I'm reading.  I think there's going to be a lot of re-reads in the mix, given my current mood.  After I've read for a square, I'll hyperlink to the review.

 

 

Bingo Square

Date Called

Book Title

Date Read

Row #1

 

 

 

 

Supernatural

 

Sweep of the Blade

Sep. 3 

 

Read by flash/candlelight

 

 

 

 

Dark Academia

 

 

 

 

Black Cat

Sep. 8 

No Escape Claws

 

 

Country House Mystery

 

Envious Casca

 

Row #2

 

 

 

X 

Ghost Stories

 Sep. 1

Lost Among the Living

 Sep. 1

 

Paint it Black

 

Dark Triumph

 Sep. 1

 

In the dark, dark woods

 

Mortal Heart

Sep. 3 

 

13

 

 

 

 

Murder Most Foul

 

St. Peter's Fair

Sep. 9 

Row #3

 

 

 

 

Shifters

 

Clean Sweep

Sep. 7 

 

Doomsday

 

 

 

 

FREE SPACE

 

 Murder by the Book: The Crime That Shocked Dickens’s London

Sep. 11 

 

Fear the Drowning Deep

 

Death on the Nile???

 

 

Amateur Sleuth

 Sep. 4

The Book Supremacy

 

Row #4

 

 

 

 

Spellbound

 

Sapphire Flames

 Sep. 5

 

Creepy Crawlies

 Sep. 3

 

 

 

New Release

 

 

 

 

Gothic

 

 

 

 

Genre:Suspense

 

 

 

Row #5

 

 

 

 

Magical Realism

 

Midnight at the Blackbird Cafe

Sep. 9 

 

Psych

 

Silence for the Dead

 Sep. 11

 

Full Moon

 

Such is Death

 

 

Darkest London

 

An Act of Villainy

 

 

Baker Street Irregulars

 

 

 



Midnight at the Blackbird Cafe

Midnight at the Blackbird Cafe - Heather Webber

I've always enjoyed Heather Webber's cozy mysteries; they're fun, well-written and usually have better-than-average plots.  So when this was announced I was eager to see what she'd come up with when there was no murder.

 

She didn't disappoint, though the overall tone of the book was a tiny bit too heavy handed for my tastes.  The power of love is a wonderful thing indeed, but my nature is not one that is comfortable with being immersed in heart tugging storylines. 

 

The book centers on two main characters: one coming to the small town of Wicklow for the first time, to see to the affairs of her grandmother's estate, and at the same time is confronted with her heritage and connection to a town she's never been to.  The second MC is the emotionally neglected daughter of the town's social maven, who has come back to town a widow with toddler in tow.  But the true main character of the book is the town itself and its curious connection to loved ones who have crossed over.

 

It was a good read, though I sensed the author was struggling to bring balance to the heavier emotions; hints of humour came from most of the characters, but never quite took hold.  If it had, I'd have probably enjoyed the book even more.  Still, I'll happily keep an eye out for more of Webber's work.

 

I read this book for Halloween Bingo's Magical Realism square.