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jenn

Murder by Death

I read cozy and historical mysteries, a bit of Paranormal/UF, and to mix it up, I read science and gardening books on occasion.

New books added - Knopf

Last batch for tonight - and possibly awhile; these are the last of the Penguin Random House (except for large print) that were left to process for the remainder of 2019.  If I get a chance I'll start with Harper Collins over the weekend.

 

HUGE thanks to Elentarri and Themis Athena for adding the covers for all these books - they are the reason you won't see ugly green boxes when you look up one of these books.

 

If you have some spare time and want to contribute to the BookLikes database building effort, please feel free to jump in and grab a batch.  The more the merrier!

 

 

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More new books - Doubleday and Random House

Here are the upcoming releases for Doubleday and Random House for the rest of 2019:

 

 

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New Penguin HC books added - the rest of them

It's been a good day - I've been ticking off the to-do items at a pretty decent clip.  Here are the final Penguin Adult HC books for 2019:

 

 

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More New Books - Penguin Adult

Here's the first half of the Penguin Books new releases through the end of the year - Easter-cat has just announced it's bed time and has threatened to destroy this post by walking all over the keyboard, so the second half will go through tomorrow.

 

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New books Added - Various Penguin Random House Imprints (Part 2)

 Ok, third time's the charm?  I've tried to post this twice before and both times Safari ate the post;  I think it's because I'm trying to cut and paste the single book entry in the last batch, so I'm leaving it alone.  

 

These are the last of the new books for 2019 by various PRH imprints.

 

 

 

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Batch #9 - just one entry but I'll be damned if I'm going to let Safari eat this post again:

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New Books Added - Various Penguin Random House Imprints (Part 1)

Elentarri is killing it - she's added images to everyone of these books; think kind thoughts and send them her way.  It was a LOT of books!

 

This was another big haul and I was only able to get through some (most) of it tonight.  Hopefully BookLikes won't be too laggy for everyone else (it did improve for me as the night went on).

 

 

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New Audio books added - second half

Elentarri blazed through the rest of this list too - and got through it with a slow BookLikes connection.  Thanks heaps for all your work Elentarri!  :D

 

Here they are - the rest of the new Penguin Random House audio books for the next three months.  BookLikes has been intermittently sloooow today, so there were a few hiccups, but these are the books that should have been added:

 

 

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New Audio books added - first half

Thanks to Themis Athena for adding covers to ALL the books listed in this post - there are at least 100 titles here.  o_O

 

I got about halfway through adding the Penguin Random House Audio books for the rest of the year, but it's time for bed (just ask Easter-cat), so here's the list so far - I'll finish up the second half tomorrow (hopefully).

 

 

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MT's newest effort ... with a little help from Easter-cat

Note: I originally reblogged this, but MT added a picture, and I deleted it, but now it won't let me re-reblog.  So if you see this twice (or 3 times!) I'm very very sorry.

 

Apologies to those who will get this twice - but he outdid himself again. MT and Easter-cat have teamed up to write the feline version of Go the F*ck to Sleep.

 

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So MbD said she was going to play me an audio book, and I had to listen to the whole thing. Before I cracked it, she explained it was short, included swearing, and was read by Samuel Jackson. OK, I can deal with this...

So we listened to Go The Fuck to Sleep.

It was funny, but for us, it was 'other person' funny. Not having kids of our own, it seemed we were sharing others pain. Then it occured to me - we have our own issue. I present:

Go The Fuck to Bed – by Easter Cat

 

Dusk is dawning, and my spirits are rising

You are obviously tired and well fed

Rather than lounge on the couch for a while

Please, can we go the fuck to bed?

 

Patting your chest, you are suggesting laps

Nope, can already see where Carlito has shed

No laundry to be done and you’ve been to the ‘loo

Suggesting we just go the fuck to bed

 

The bees are all home, the dishes are done

Cats are intelligent, it is often said

Since your work for the day is done

Quit pissing about, let’s go the fuck to bed!

 

It’s getting dark, the back doors are shut

Now Lito is going off his head

Chasing his tail and other mysteries

I really think we should go the fuck to bed!

 

The chickens are quiet but the possums are active

I hear them running across the shed

Pappa is drooling on the couch

Why can’t we go the fuck to bed?

 

Finally success, the humans are moving

Bringing chocolate and books to be read

Don’t care if they bring the kitchen sink

We can finally go the fuck to bed

 

Now Lito is here and prancing around

Pretty sure I can smack his head

Now there is yelling and I jump off

Why the fuck did I want to go to bed…

 



New Berkely/NAL books added!

Thank you to Elentarri for adding all the covers - about 95 of them all up - to these new listings!   

 

I've finally gotten a little downtime and I thought to myself ... do I do that last load of laundry, or do I add new and upcoming books to BookLikes?

 

So here's the first round - Berkley/NAL titles published in the next 3 months.  As before, links to the covers are behind the spoiler tags - if you have the time and inclination to contribute to the database, grab the cover, search the ISBN here on BL, and upload to cover.

 

I'm out of practice, so there will be a few listings here that might not need the covers because they were already in the database and I didn't catch them in time to remove them from the list.  Sorry in advance!

 

 

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Halloween Bingo 2019 - My tracking post #6

Another Bingo! I'm on fire now - two, count 'em two bingos.  I should probably report them soon ...

 

I still have my two squares left for blackout - I can only plead Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell by Susanna Clarke as my excuse, and it doesn't even qualify for either square.  My recent acquisition of Cozy Crime Stories has "Gothic Fantasy" in big embossed letters on the cover, so I might try reading a few of those short stories for my Gothic read.  Suspense ... I have no inspiration, but I still have all three Transfiguration spells so something will present itself.

 

For my BookLikes tracking post, I'm going to rely on what I did last year, building an overall image as boxes are called.

 

 

Squares are greyed out until they're called.  

Called squares will be full-strength.

 

Read but not called squares will be greyed out below.

Once a square has been called and read, I'll move that piece from below to cover the square. 

 

My markers this year are pieces of a full image, seen here:

         
       
   
   
       

 

 

My tentative plan for what I'm reading.  I think there's going to be a lot of re-reads in the mix, given my current mood.  After I've read for a square, I'll hyperlink to the review.

 

 

Bingo Square

Date Called

Book Title

Date Read

Row #1

 

 

 

X 

Supernatural

 Sep. 15

Sweep of the Blade

Sep. 3 

X 

Read by flash/candlelight

Sep. 20 

Magic Bleeds

Sep. 23 

 

Dark Academia

Sep. 24 

Hex Hall

Oct. 3 

X 

Black Cat

Sep. 8 

Murder in the Reading Room

Sep. 19 

X 

Country House Mystery

Sep. 13 

Envious Casca

Sep. 17 

Row #2

 

 

 

X 

Ghost Stories

 Sep. 1

Lost Among the Living

 Sep. 1

X 

Paint it Black

Sep 28 

Dark Triumph

 Sep. 1

X 

In the dark, dark woods

Sep. 26 

Mortal Heart

Sep. 3 

 

13

 

Summoned to Thirteenth Grave

 Sep. 21

 

Murder Most Foul

 

St. Peter's Fair

Sep. 9 

Row #3

 

 

 

 

Shifters

 

Clean Sweep

Sep. 7 

 

Doomsday

 

Magic Strikes

Sep 20 

X 

FREE SPACE

 

Murder by the Book: The Crime That Shocked Dickens’s London

Sep. 11 

 

Fear the Drowning Deep

 

Magic Burns

Sep. 19 

X 

Amateur Sleuth

 Sep. 4

The Book Supremacy

Sep. 14 

Row #4

 

 

 

X 

Spellbound

Sep. 22 

Sapphire Flames

 Sep. 5

X 

Creepy Crawlies

 Sep. 3

Kill The Farm Boy (Tales of Pell, #1)

Sep. 19 

 

New Release

 Oct. 15

Game of Bones

Oct. 7 

 

Gothic

 

 

 

 

Genre:Suspense

 

 

 

Row #5

 

 

 

 

Magical Realism

 

Midnight at the Blackbird Cafe

Sep. 9 

X 

Psych

Sep 16 

Silence for the Dead

 Sep. 11

 X

Full Moon

 Oct. 2

Magic Stars

Oct. 1 

 X

Darkest London

Sep. 17 

An Act of Villainy

Sep. 25 

 

Baker Street Irregulars

 

Demon Glass

 Oct. 4



Reading progress update: I've read 265 out of 846 pages.

Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell - Susanna Clarke

The writing is still charming and wonderful, but I've reached the 25% mark and the pace has slowed considerably.  Mr. Norrell and Jonathan Strange have only just met.

 

I've checked the audio out from the library and will start listening as well as reading either today or Monday; hopefully that will get me over the slump in the middle.

 



Childfree by Choice

Childfree By Choice - Amy Blackstone

It's always a little bit harder for me to discuss non-fiction books I've listened to on audio; My audio comprehension is still not a match to my reading comprehension and I'm not quite as able to recall the details as well.  

 

Even so, this book was eye opening for me.  MT and I are child free by choice, and I've definitely experienced the bog-standard lines:  you'll change your mind and it's different when it's yours and it's not too late, as well as the arguments for more exciting holidays and built-in old-age care. (All of which are fallacies: I almost never change my mind about anything, I'd feel no different if 'it' was my own, and at 49, which is the last time the 'not too late' argument was used, it's categorically too late, if not medically, then rationally. And while I'm willing to concede that some holidays might be more fun, there's no guarantee that anyone's children won't stick them in an old-age home when the time comes.  Harsh, but true.)

 

But I've never experienced the vitriolic rhetoric aimed at us as a group; an upside to having always avoided the Editorial/Opinion section of the news, I guess.  Wow.  People need to worry less about what everyone else is doing and look inward; if these pundits have time to turn themselves inside out about other people's life choices, they have too much free time on their hands and not enough perspective on actual, real world issues.

 

As I was listening to this book and thinking "how have I missed all this nonsense, and who do I thank for that?" it started to niggle at me that, actually, I might have been on the receiving end of some of the blowback to choosing child free, I've just never acknowledged it as such.  Not from a professional standpoint; frankly, I think my bosses were all too happy I'd not be taking maternity leave to be fussed about my rebellion against my (apparent) civic duty.  But personally, socially ... that becomes trickier.  Have I lost friends after they had kids?  Certainly.  MT and I used to have a much more jam-packed social calendar, until friends started spawning and we lost touch with more and more of them.  But I can't say with any certainty that it's because we chose not to have kids; the toll newborns take on couples, then the non-stop demands of toddlers, could explain a lot of it.  The medical issues that have necessarily slowed both MT and I down certainly are to blame for some of it too.  But I can't be sure our choice not to have kids isn't at play either.  Both my best friends have kids, and I never lost touch with either of them - in fact I was a huge part of first 10 years of one of the kids' lives, until I moved down under.

 

Anyway, the takeaway here is that the book has left me with things to chew on, and it certainly opened my eyes to societal reactions to those who choose to not procreate.  So in that sense, the book was an outstanding success.  It was, however, a dry read; very much structured like a dissertation that's been fleshed out for publication.  I think the narrator of the audio helps overcome that a little, though it's still by no means a riveting read.  MT overheard it when I was listening while gardening, and he though I was listening to the news.

 

I was also constantly jarred by her use of fertility; no question she's using it exactly the way it should be used, but to me fertility has always meant the ability to procreate, while in this book she uses it to refer to actual birthing of children, ie the fertility rates dropped during the global economic crisis to her means people stopped having children during the GFC.  I kept thinking 'what does the GFC have to do with ability to conceive?'.  That's my shortcoming though, not the author's.

 

All in all it was a very worthwhile read for me.  Depending on one's level of engagement in this issue, individual results may vary.  I will end this with saying it's a good book for anyone - with children or without - interested in the values and reactions society places on people when it comes to planning the future of their families.

 

 



No One Is Too Small To Make a Difference

No One Is Too Small to Make a Difference - Greta Thunberg

Greta Thunberg is the bomb.

 

I first heard about Greta when she began school striking last year, but only, at first, as a curiosity (on the part of the press).  It wasn't until her speech before the UK parliament that she got enough press that I was able to understand her story. When I read the speech in the Guardian, I was laughing - in the best way - at the sheer audacity, bravery, and brilliance, of a 16 year old standing before the august (HA!) body of British lawmakers and telling them that:

 

The UK is, however, very special.  Not only for its mind-blowing historical carbon debt, but also for its current, very creative, carbon accounting.

 

and:

 

This ongoing irresponsible behaviour will no doubt be remembered in history as one of the greatest failures of mankind.

 

and my favorite:

 

Did you just hear what I said? Is my English okay? Is the microphone on? Because I'm beginning to wonder.

 

I handed the speech to MT and said You HAVE TO read this. It's written by a 16 year old Swedish girl whose first language isn't even English! (We who have lived our lives isolated on single language land masses - and yes, yes, Spanish, but it wasn't widespread when I was a kid - are always in awe of those of you who juggle multiple languages with ease, never mind speak it better than us natives.)  I've been a following her in the news ever since and I just admire the hell out of her.  I found this little collection of all her speeches up to and including her UK Parliament speech, on the bookstore counter, and snapped it up.  

 

It's nothing fancy; just a small booklet containing all 11 of her speeches through 23 April 2019, and if read cover to cover (which I don't recommend), it's repetitive.  But the message is powerful, and like it or not, it's dead-on accurate: our house is on fire; what we would never do to our own lawn, we're doing with impunity to the rest of the planet, and we're collectively living like a magic, 23rd-hour solution that will make everything ok again is going to miraculously fly out our asses.  

 

Greta is making waves because she's 16 and she's the only one willing to stand in front of entire governments and actually say, with only a tiny bit more tact: you're all idiots and you're the generation that will always be known as those idiots who destroyed civilisation as we know it.

 

On a more first-world-problem note: this wonderful 16 year old was nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize and even though she didn't win (and should have), I am still thankful I'm not a teen today.  Life is hard enough as an adolescent, but now teens are nominated for Nobels; getting into Yale or Oxford suddenly isn't the acme of teen achievement any more.  Yikes.



Reading progress update: I've listened 415 out of 480 minutes.

Childfree By Choice - Amy Blackstone

While I wouldn't call this a 5 star read, it has been fascinating so far - and I'm on the last chapter, likely to finish up on the drive home - simply because I've had my eyes opened to 1. just how oblivious I am in all ways societal, and 2. how truly fortunate I am to have had the upbringing I did.  It's a gift that I was raised not to be concerned with what others think of me, beyond a general preference for being well regarded, and another gift to not be harassed by family and friends for the life decisions I make.

 

Full review with meaningful details will come later today, after I'm officially finished.



Reading progress update: I've listened 163 out of 480 minutes.

Childfree By Choice - Amy Blackstone

It's official:  I've been living in a cave the last three decades.  This has been a revelation so far; I had no idea I was so unpatriotic, immoral and selfish.  Ok, well, I maybe knew I was a little bit selfish, though I'd have said choosing not to have kids I didn't want because my lack of maternal instinct would have ended badly (or badly dysfunctional) for the kids was the mature, not selfish thing to do, but obviously I'm just self-rationalising.

 

The author is keeping things pretty even-keeled so far, presenting a lot of facts and statistics.  It reads like a fleshed out dissertation to me, but the information is fascinating, so the drier tone isn't bothering me, nor is the narrator's somewhat flat deliver (though her attempts at other voices cracks me up).  

 

So far the take away is that anyone who choose to have anything more or less than 2 children is an aberration.  Good to know.  Don't care, but good to know.